Journal of the Plant Resources Center of the University of Texas at Austin
Number 3 — December 2000
[Published: 19 December 2000]


Contents:

Passiflora microstipula, a New Species of Passifloraceae from Southeast Mexico.
Lawrence E. Gilbert and John M. MacDougal View Abstract

Moutabea gentryi (Polygalaceae), a New Species of Liana from Central America and Colombia.
Tom Wendt View Abstract

The Texas Species of Calliandra (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae).
B. L. Turner View Abstract

Rhynchospora megaplumosa (Cyperaceae), a New Species from Central Florida, with Supplemental Notes and a Key to Rhynchospora series Plumosae.
Edwin L. Bridges and Steve L. Orzell View Abstract

Phylogenetic Implications of Pollen Morphology and Ultrastructure in the Barnadesioideae (Asteraceae).
Zaiming Zhao, John J. Skvarla, Robert K. Jansen, and Melanie L. DeVore View Abstract

Hoffmannseggia humilis, the Correct Name for H. gladiata (Fabaceae).
Beryl B. Simpson View Abstract

On the Authorship of the Tribal name Gilieae (Polemoniaceae).
Verne Grant View Abstract

Abstracts

Passiflora microstipula, a New Species of Passifloraceae from Southeast Mexico.
Lawrence E. Gilbert and John M. MacDougal
1—5

Abstract: Passiflora microstipula was originally collected as seed in 1978 at the Los Tuxtlas biological station, Veracruz, Mexico. When plants grown from these seeds flowered in cultivation the next year, it was immediately clear that this species represented a completely new group within Passiflora. P. microstipula exhibits unusual characteristics such as tendril-borne flowers and conspicuously winged seeds. Observations of this species in cultivation revealed that significant morphological changes occur as development proceeds from a seedling to reproductively mature lianas. Morphology and ecology are discussed with regard to the species’ likely taxonomic placement within the genus.
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Moutabea gentryi (Polygalaceae), a New Species of Liana from Central America and Colombia.
Tom Wendt
6—12

Abstract: The new species Moutabea gentryi, known from Costa Rica, Panama, and northwestern Colombia, is the northernmost member of its genus and the only species of Moutabea known from Central America. It is related to M. aculeata of the western Amazon basin but is distinguished by features of venation, leaf surface texturing, petiole color, and calyx pubescence. Study of the types of M. aculeata and M. longifolia indicates that the latter is a synonym of the former. Problematic populations and probably undescribed taxa related to M. aculeata and M. gentryi exist in western South America.
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The Texas Species of Calliandra (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae).
B. L. Turner
13—18

Abstract: The genus Calliandra is represented in Texas by five species: C. biflora Tharp, a relatively uncommon taxon of southern Texas and Tamaulipas, Mexico; C. conferta Benth., a somewhat uncommon species of northern Mexico, south-central and southern Texas; C. eriophylla Benth., a widespread variable species of Mexico, represented in Texas by rare outlier populations in Uvalde County; C. humilis Benth. (including C. herbacea Engelm. Ex A. Gray), a very distinctive herbaceous species of Mexico, occurring in Texas in mostly montane igneous soils of the trans-Pecos; and C. iselyi B. L. Turner, sp. nov., a newly proposed species from the Big Bend region of trans-Pecos, Texas, this previously included under the descriptive parameters of C. conferta. A key to the Texas species of Calliandra is provided along with dot maps showing their distribution.
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Rhynchospora megaplumosa (Cyperaceae), a New Species from Central Florida, with Supplemental Notes and a Key to Rhynchospora series Plumosae.
Edwin L. Bridges and Steve L. Orzell
19—25

Abstract: Rhynchospora megaplumosa is described as a new species of Rhynchospora, endemic to central Florida, in the section Rhynchospora series Plumosae. It is restricted to sandy openings in scrubby flatwoods in two localized areas of central Florida, in Polk and Manatee counties, where it flowers profusely in areas following burning. Rhynchospora megaplumosa is most closely related to R. pineticola and R. plumosa, but is distinguished by several characters, most conspicuously by its longer (5—7 mm) perianth bristles and golden-brown, narrowly lanceolate, longer spikelets. A key is provided to distinguish it from other species in the series. The habitat and associated species of R. megaplumosa are also discussed.
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Phylogenetic Implications of Pollen Morphology and Ultrastructure in the Barnadesioideae (Asteraceae).
Zaiming Zhao, John J. Skvarla, Robert K. Jansen, and Melanie L. DeVore
26—40

Abstract: The subfamily Barnadesioideae of the Asteraceae consists of nine genera and approximately 90 species. Both molecular and morphological phylogenies indicate that this subfamily is sister to the rest of the family. We have used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study pollen of 41 species from all genera of the Barnadesioideae. Three general pollen types are described in the subfamily: Barnadesia-type (Barnadesia, Huarpea), Chuquiraga-type (Chuquiraga, Doniophyton, Duseniella, Fulcaldea) and Dasyphyllum-type (Dasyphyllum and Schlechtendalia). A fourth type, Arnaldoa-type, consisting solely of Arnaldoa, is intermediate between the Chuquiraga- and Dasyphyllum- types. These types parallel and confirm findings from previous studies. Psilolophate grains are found only in the Barnadesia-type. Pollen with a cavity (cavea) between pollen wall units in each of the three interapertural regions is present in Barnadesia (Barnadesia-type), Dasyphyllum (Dasyphyllum-type) and Arnaldoa (Arnaldoa-type). The Chuquiraga-type does not have cavate pollen. Intercolpar concavities occur only in the Dasyphyllum- and Arnaldoa- types. In the latter, intercolpar regions are accompanied by pairs of indentations flanking the colpi. The presence of intercolpar concavities in Dasyphyllum and Schlechtendalia, often cited as a synapomorphy for the Barnadesioideae and Calyceraceae, has apparently evolved independently within the subfamily. Chuquiraga pollen exhibits the least derived palynological features in the subfamily. Palynological characters, when placed in the context of current phylogenies for the Barnadesioideae, suggest additional phylogenetic analyses are needed to re-evaluate intergeneric relationships within the subfamily.
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Hoffmannseggia humilis, the Correct Name for H. gladiata (Fabaceae).
Beryl B. Simpson
41—42

Abstract: In order to correct an error in the recently published revision of Hoffmannseggia in North America, the correct nomenclature for H. humilis is provided.
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On the Authorship of the Tribal name Gilieae (Polemoniaceae).
Verne Grant
43—44

Abstract: Gilieae was validly published at the tribal level in 1959 by Grant, based on Reichenbach’s unranked 1837 basionym. Subsequent republication of the name by Porter and Johnson is superfluous.
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