Journal of the Plant Resources Center of the University of Texas at Austin
Number 7 — December 2004
[Published: 6 December 2004]


Contents:

Ipomoea cuprinacoma (Convolvulaceae): A New Morning Glory from Southwestern Mexico.
Eleazar Carranza and J. Andrew McDonald View Abstract

Comments upon the Taxonomy and Typification of Amaranthus torreyi, A. fimbriatus, and A. venulosus (Amaranthaceae).
Billie L. Turner View Abstract

A Revision of Phyllanthus section Hylaeanthus (Euphorbiaceae).
Grady L. Webster View Abstract

A New Flagelliflorous Species of Stenanona (Annonaceae) from Mexico, with a Review of the Phenomenon of Flagelliflory.
George E. Schatz and Tom Wendt View Abstract

A New Variety of Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) from the Big Bend Region of Trans-Pecos, Texas.
Billie L. Turner View Abstract

A New Species of Mortoniodendron (Malvaceae sens. lat.) from the Rain Forests of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico.
Laurence J. Dorr and Tom Wendt View Abstract

A Revision of Capraria (Scrophulariaceae).
Justin K. Williams View Abstract

Abstracts

Ipomoea cuprinacoma (Convolvulaceae): A New Morning Glory from Southwestern Mexico.
Eleazar Carranza and J. Andrew McDonald
1—4

Abstract: A new species of morning glory from southwestern Mexico, Ipomoea cuprinacoma (Convolvulaceae), is described. The species is assigned to Ipomoea series Arborescentes with other stout lianas and trees, and distinguished from I. populina on the basis of slender stems, canescent peduncles and leaf blades, exclusively axial inflorescences, and long, pale-coppery seed hairs.

Resumen: Se describe una especie nueva del suroeste de México, Ipomoea cuprinacoma (Convolvulaceae), la cual se ubica con otras lianas y árboles en Ipomoea serie Arborescentes. Ipomoea cuprinacoma se distingue de I. populina por sus tallos incipientes delgados, pedúnculos y láminas canescentes, inflorescencias exclusivamente axiales, y comas seminales de color cobre pálido.

Return to Vol. 7 Contents

Comments upon the Taxonomy and Typification of Amaranthus torreyi, A. fimbriatus, and A. venulosus (Amaranthaceae).
Billie L. Turner
5—10

Abstract: Amaranthus torreyi and A. fimbriatus are partially sympatric, seemingly weedy species native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. A taxonomic account of each is provided, along with maps showing their distribution. Lectotypification of A. venulosus is provided; the taxon is treated as a form of A. fimbriatus.
Return to Vol. 7 Contents

A Revision of Phyllanthus section Hylaeanthus (Euphorbiaceae).
Grady L. Webster
11—27

Abstract: A revision of Phyllanthus section Hylaeanthus (subgenus Conami) treats 6 species, mostly with a primarily Amazonian distribution, as well as one species of uncertain affinity. The section is characterized within subgenus Conami by a tendency to dioecy, unramified branchlets, distinctive pollen grains with pilate exine ornamentation, and indehiscent fruits with sarcotestal seeds. Two species are described as new: Phyllanthus puntii from western Brazil (Acre) and Bolivia, and P. awaensis from northern Ecuador. Two new subspecies of Phyllanthus attenuatus are described: P. a. ssp. incarum from western Amazonia in Ecuador, Peru, and Colombia; and P. a. ssp. tucuruiensis from Amazonian Brazil. Phyllanthus manausensis is reduced to a synonym of P. madeirensis. A key is provided to help distinguish specimens of taxa in sect. Hylaeanthus from superficially similar but unrelated species of other subgenera of Phyllanthus.
Return to Vol. 7 Contents

A New Flagelliflorous Species of Stenanona (Annonaceae) from Mexico, with a Review of the Phenomenon of Flagelliflory.
George E. Schatz and Tom Wendt
28—38

Abstract: Stenanona flagelliflora is described as a new species of small, flagelliflorous tree from deep-soil hill rain forests of the Uxpanapa-Chimalapa region of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, in Veracruz and Oaxaca, Mexico. In flagelliflory, flowers are borne on essentially leafless modified whip-like branches that trail across the ground; this is the first report of the phenonenon for the flora of Mexico or Central America. The phenomenon of flagelliflory and its worldwide occurrence are reviewed. The Central American genus Stenanona is not closely related to other New World annonaceous genera with flagelliflorous species but rather is likely most closely related to the Old World species of Polyalthia with superficially inaperturate but internally disulculate pollen. The distribution of S. flagelliflora and of its closest relatives, as well as the existence of flagelliflory in Mexican rain forest, provide additional data supporting the persistence of rain forest lineages in Mexico throughout climatically adverse periods of the late Cenozoic. The new species is considered to be Critically Endangered (CR) under the IUCN Red List classification.

Resumen: Se describe Stenanona flagelliflora como una especie nueva de arbolito flagelifloro de las selvas de lomerío de la región de Uxpanapa-Chimalapa del Istmo de Tehuantepec en los estados de Veracruz y Oaxaca, México. En el fenómeno de la flagelifloría, las flores o las inflorescencias nacen de ramitas largas, delgadas y flexibles, más o menos afilas, y rasteras sobre el suelo. En este trabajo se presenta el primer reporte del fenómeno de flagelifloría en la flora de México. Se hace una reseña de la flagelifloría a nivel mundial. Stenanona, un género centroamericano, no está muy emparentado con los otros géneros americanos de anonáceas con especies flagelifloras; más bien parece probable que sus relaciones sean más estrechas con un grupo de especies de Polyalthia del Viejo Mundo con polen externamente no aperturado e internamente bisulculado. La distribución de S. flagelliflora y las de sus congéneres más cercanos, junto con la presencia de flagelifloría en las selvas de México, apoyan a la hipótesis de la persistencia de estirpes selváticas en México a través de periodos climáticos adversos del Cenozoico tardío. La especie nueva se considera en la categoría de “en peligro crítico” (CR) según los criterios de la UICN.

Return to Vol. 7 Contents

A New Variety of Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) from the Big Bend Region of Trans-Pecos, Texas.
Billie L. Turner
39—43

Abstract: A new infraspecific taxon of the widespread western species Stanleya pinnata is described from the Big Bend Region of Trans-Pecos, Texas as var. texana. The taxon is distinguished from other varieties of S. pinnata in having smaller flowers, nearly glabrous gynophores, and lanceolate entire leaves which are, so far as known, never deeply divided or pinnate. It is isolated from the closest known populations of S. pinnata by some 500 km and is represented by small populations largely restricted to bare gypso-calcareous outcrops in southern Brewster Co., Texas. In addition, the long recognized S. pinnata var. integrifolia is reduced to the rank of forma integrifolia.
Return to Vol. 7 Contents

A New Species of Mortoniodendron (Malvaceae sens. lat.) from the Rain Forests of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico.
Laurence J. Dorr and Tom Wendt
44—52

Abstract: The taxonomic history, defining characters, and relationships of the genus Mortoniodendron are briefly sketched. Characters that define M. pentagonum, a species known from a limited area in Guatemala, are elaborated. A closely related but distinct species from Veracruz, Mexico, M. uxpanapense Dorr & T. Wendt, is described and illustrated. The new species is considered to be Critically Endangered (CR) under the IUCN red list classification.

Resumen: Se presenta un bosquejo breve de la historia taxonómica, los caracteres genéricos, y las afinidades del género Mortoniodendron. Se presentan datos sobre M. pentagonum, una especie restringida a un área de distribución muy limitada en Guatemala. Se describe M. uxpanapense Dorr & T. Wendt como especie nueva para la ciencia, estrechamente relacionada a M. pentagonum, y se incluyen ilustraciones de la misma. La especie nueva se considera en la categoría de “en peligro crítico” (CR) según los criterios de la UICN.

Return to Vol. 7 Contents

A Revision of Capraria (Scrophulariaceae).
Justin K. Williams
53—78

Abstract: Herbarium and field studies of the chiefly neotropical genus Capraria have led to the recognition of four species. Capraria frutescens and C. mexicana are essentially endemic to Mexico. Capraria biflora is a widespread species that occurs throughout Mexico, Central and South America, the West Indies, and southern Florida. Capraria peruviana grows in northwestern South America and the Galápagos Islands. A complete account of synonymy and typification is provided, along with a key to species, scanning electron micrographs of pollen, stigmas and seeds, photographs, illustrations, and distribution maps.
Return to Vol. 7 Contents

 
Back to Lundellia   Lundellia Home Page


U. Texas at Austin | Biological Sciences | Plant Resources Center | Contact Us